Heights Philadelphia Unveils New Plan To Transform Education and Empower Local Communities

By

Students and leadership team of Heights Philadelphia.
Image via Facebook, Heights Philadelphia.
Heights Philadelphia currently serves over 3,000 students in Philadelphia. The education nonprofit recently unveiled a plan to increase that number to 5,000 by 2029.

Heights Philadelphia, a local education nonprofit that helps students prepare for life after high school, is expanding its reach and programming, writes Mike DeNardo for KYW Newsradio.

Earlier this week, the nonprofit released a strategic plan to expand its programming to 5,000 students by 2029. 

“It’s a 10-year vision for impact where we’re really mobilizing the city, students, families and our organization to point to economic mobility for young people here in Philadelphia,” said Heights Philadelphia co-president Sara Woods.

George Washington Carver High School of Engineering and Science senior, Malea Williams, credits the organization for helping prepare her college application essays and selecting schools.

Meanwhile, Parkway Center City Middle College senior, Dock Brown, noted that the college and career counseling received from Heights has been invaluable. 

The nonprofit made headlines last year when Jason Kelce pledged support from his foundation.

Heights co-president, Sean Vereen, said the organization is aiming for greater corporate support and government partnerships over the next decade. 

“We’re really going to create an opportunity for many more students,” Vereen said. “… the opportunity is to connect to real jobs.”

Heights Philadelphia is the product of the merger of Philadelphia Futures and Steppingstone Scholars, and currently serves 3,000 students in 23 Philadelphia middle and high schools. 

Read more about how Heights Philadelphia aims to support more students in KYW Newsradio.

_____

Connect With Your Community

Subscribe for stories that matter!

"*" indicates required fields

Hidden
PT Yes
This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Advertisement